Reptiles overview

Each year the over 30 alligator farms in Florida alone produce 300,000 pounds of meat and 15,000 skins. This prime example of a sustainable resource yields the farmers between $5 and $7 per pound depending on the cut while hides average about $25 per foot wholesale. In addition to the production of a wildlife product, many facilities provide a tremendous public education function. A fine example of this is the St. Augustine Alligator Farm. First established in 1893, this farm is home to all species of crocodilians found in the world. This is the only place all 23 species may be seen in a single facility. The farm has worked with the University of Florida for over 30 years on research projects and also is the site of a bird rookery where visitors may see many species of wading birds nesting and raising young in the wild.

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Conservation Influencers

Conservation Influencers is a searchable directory of the animal activist, environmental and ecological lobby. It examines the history, mission, methodology and reputation of NGOs to assess their impact on the global conservation cause.

Franz Weber Foundation

From 1990 until 2015, Franz Weber Foundation (FFW) managed the Fazao-Malfakassa National Park in Togo, which was, according to an in-depth investigation by Duke University, ‘established by forcing the local communities off their land and without taking into consideration their point of view’. That same study cited convincing evidence from reports published in 1990, confirming that competition for land use was already ‘creating conflict between the local communities and park managers’. In 2015, Togo refused to renew FFW’s contract because, the report says, ‘local communities were still excluded from the management of the natural resources of their land’ and FFW had ‘failed to fulfil its contract’. Franz Weber Foundation plays a major role within CITES because it funds and manages from Switzerland the African Elephant Coalition (AEC), which represents 32 African range states, some of which have barely any elephants and others none at all. Contrary to the wishes of the range states in Southern Africa, which manage most of the world’s wild elephant populations, the AEC at CITES’ CoPs repeatedly tables proposals to put all of the world’s elephants in appendix I. And the AEC uses its voting power to keep in place prohibitions on ivory sales and all other trade in elephant-related derivatives, including skins and hair, which Southern African nations wish to legalise.

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